Red Hook Regatta

Photos of the 2015 Red Hook Regatta by Brett Wood

David SheinkopfComment
Our Master of Ceremonies Eugene preparing the crowd for the start of the event

Our Master of Ceremonies Eugene preparing the crowd for the start of the event

Jesus Benitez talks about organizing the event

Jesus Benitez talks about organizing the event

Crowd awaiting the start of the race

Crowd awaiting the start of the race

Ben from The Good Fork brought his family and their killer lemonade

Ben from The Good Fork brought his family and their killer lemonade

Spectators lean out for a better view 

Spectators lean out for a better view 

Stevedore waits for his boat

Stevedore waits for his boat

Laurenzo Reed navigating the seas

Laurenzo Reed navigating the seas

Fans cheer for our racers and crane operators

Fans cheer for our racers and crane operators

John Reid racking up points with his boat "The Lake Show"

John Reid racking up points with his boat "The Lake Show"

3 2 1 GO!

3 2 1 GO!

Eugene explains the rules of the race

Eugene explains the rules of the race

Boat doctor David Sheinkopf at work

Boat doctor David Sheinkopf at work

Tied for first "The Blue Falcon" by Jesus Benitez

Tied for first "The Blue Falcon" by Jesus Benitez

Crowd on the Red Hook blocks and flag by artist Azikiwe Mohammed

Crowd on the Red Hook blocks and flag by artist Azikiwe Mohammed

Laurenzo Reed and his stevedore Brycen Benn wins second place

Laurenzo Reed and his stevedore Brycen Benn wins second place

David Sheinkopf announces the winners

David Sheinkopf announces the winners

Success on the water!

Jesus BenitezComment
Photo by Allison Knoll  

Photo by Allison Knoll  

The first annual 3d printed race was a complete success! I want to thank everyone who came out and supported us. As you know this is the first ever race of its kind. So by being there, you all were a part of history. Hopefully everyone will come back next year to the second annual Red Hook Regatta.

We learned a lot during the past 3 months organizing this event: how to create 3d models using Rhinoceros, how to install RC systems into boats, and how to organize an event. We even learned more about the place we grew up, Red Hook. I'm really grateful to be a Digital Steward. Then to pair up with Pioneer Works, was just amazing. We took an idea David Sheinkopf had and turned it into a full blown event. One that got us interviews and articles, brought the Red Hook community together, and even landed us on PIX 11!

Though the event, in my eyes, was very successful, there were some problems. But since this was the first year, that's to be expected. One problem we faced was the winner of the first heat took in too much water and couldn't compete in the final. Because of this, the event ended in a tie. Next year we hope to make the boats water-tight and impenetrable. Maybe next year we can have a continuation and really see who the winner was -- The U.S.S Blue Falcon or The Lakeshow. As for this regatta? I'm pretty sure everyone that attended would say they had a boat load of fun!    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last Week Workshop

David SheinkopfComment

We have 5 days until the event. Which means: TIME TO MAKE THINGS HAPPEN. 

 

Laurenzo is media PRO. Here he is being interviewed by Charlie from BRIC Arts. 

Laurenzo is media PRO. Here he is being interviewed by Charlie from BRIC Arts. 

Marlaina painting our "shipping containers," i.e. foam bricks. 

Marlaina painting our "shipping containers," i.e. foam bricks. 

More press! Andrew from MASHABLE takes a picture of John. 

More press! Andrew from MASHABLE takes a picture of John. 

Red Hook lighter ship 3D model

Jesus Benitez1 Comment

This is a 3D model of the lighter ship from the Red Hook Waterfront Museum. I used Rhinocerus to create this model and took a couple days to fine tune the whole model. Designing this model was fun and it helped me learn more on how to actually design in Rhinocerus. After I create something I sit back, look at it, and just admire my work. I feel like it's something to be proud of and I show off everything I do all my friends/family.

Barge Vs. Container ships

David SheinkopfComment
       Lighter ship from the Red Hook Waterfront Museum

       Lighter ship from the Red Hook Waterfront Museum

A Lighter is a long, flat-bottomed barge, and can hold up to 1,500 tons of cargo per trip. Lighter ships have no engine and are pulled by a tugboat to their destination. Barges were built mainly for river and canal cargo transportation. Today barges are used for low value bulk items or very heavy cargo. This is because barges are  less costly to operate then others ships.

 

Container ships are ships that carry cargo from all across the world in truck size containers. There are several different types of container ships: bulk vessels, breakbulk vessels, ro-ro vessels, multi-purpose vessels, tanker vessels, crude carriers, LNG carriers, and reefer vessels.

 

                                  Container Ship

                                  Container Ship

Although all these ships have different names, they are all used for the same thing. Some carry cars and other types of transportation, some carry natural resources like oil, and some carry food. The sole purpose of these ships is to import and export goods around the world.

Brooklyn Boatworks

Jesus BenitezComment

On June 11th Red Hook Regatta we took a trip to Brooklyn Bridge Park to attend the Brooklyn Boatworks boating event. When we got to the event area we noticed four handcrafted boats sitting in the water waiting for some boatsmen to take them on their first journey into the sea. Around 12:30 pm everyone gathered around the dock, then people entered the boats and started sailing. Unfortunately there wasn't much wind, so most of the boats were at a standstill. Nevertheless we gathered a lot of information such as rules, weather, materials and some boating terminology, like draft & freeboard. Draft refers to the water below, while freeboard refers to the water above a ship. It was time well spent and we will apply our new knowledge to our boat race event.



Quick And Dirty 3D Modeling : The Nautilus

David SheinkopfComment

The first step when creating this ship was to find a photo with all sides and angles of the ship. Then we cropped the image in Preview. Right after doing that we imported the images into Rhinoceros the 3D modeling software. After importing the images into the software we then began to trace each 2D image into a wireframe that then was transformed into a three dimensional object. This is the ship from 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. 

Heres The Blueprint I Used Before Modeling It 

Heres The Blueprint I Used Before Modeling It 

Heres The Version I Made Using The 3D Modeling Software

Heres The Version I Made Using The 3D Modeling Software

Quick & Dirty 3D Modeling: World War 1 Ship

Jesus BenitezComment

Today Laurenzo and I learned a new method to use for 3D modeling. When using Rhino you are able to upload pictures and then create a model with those pictures through tracing the curves of the images.. After uploading pictures with different views of a boat we traced the entire layout of the boat from three perspectives: top view, side view, and perspective view. I created another boat model without using this technique and I noticed that it was harder because without anything to trace you have to create everything from scratch. The thing I liked the most about using this method was that it is much easier and it reminds me of when I used to draw with my best friend as a child.  

This is the boat I originally created from:

This is what I designed with using the image above. This one took me about an hour to design:

This is a boat I designed without the quick and dirty method the day before. This one took about 3-4 hours to create. It took time to mess around and create the details even though it's not as clean as the one above. 

This is the first boat I designed, it took me around the same time, but when I finished I knew I could do better. 

Valentino Scope Out

LaurenzoComment

Thursday June 4th 2015

David, Jesus, and Myself Headed over to the Valentino pier to observe, get more information and plan out more rules for the regatta. While at the pier we learned the way that wakes work, boats create ripple effects In the water which are also known as Wakes. It's important for us to find out this information to know how to judge the water and to also know what kinds of effects it will take on the boats on the day of the regatta.